Embracing Choices
for Better Living, LLC
Common Issues:
Gambling Addiction
Anxiety or Fears
Depression
Relationship Issues
Divorce
ADHD
Anger Management
Elderly Persons
Mania
Mood Disorders
Loss or GriefCommon Issues:
Gambling Addiction
Anxiety or Fears
Depression
Relationship Issues
Divorce
ADHD
Anger Management
Elderly Persons
Mania
Mood Disorders
Loss or Grief
OCD Obsessive Compusive Disorder
Substance Abuse
Trauma and PTSD
Mental Health
Dissociative DO Cutting Have you been feeling down. I you know
Impulse Control Phobias
Personality Disorders
Psychosis
Thinking Disorders
Internet addiction
gaming addiction


about "it" but you really aren't convinced that you feel "that bad."
You're not "a crazy person."
Good news, you don't have to be crazy to get support!!
How do you know when it is time? Try taking this depression quiz:

http://depressionscreen.org/depression_quiz_a.html
OCD Obsessive Compusive Disorder
Substance Abuse
Trauma and PTSD
Mental Health
Impulse Control Phobias
Personality Disorders
Psychosis
Thinking Disorders
Internet addiction
gamingaddiction


about "it" but you really aren't convinced that you feel "that bad."
You're not "a crazy person."
Good news, you don't have to be crazy to get support!!
How do you know when it is time? Try taking this depression quiz:

http://depressionscreen.org/depression_quiz_a.html
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Double click here to edit this text.


Manic Episode

Criteria A-D constitute a manic episode. At least one lifetime manic episode is required for the diagnosis of bipolar I disorder.


Criteria


A. A distinct period of abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood and abnormally and persistently increased activity or energy, lasting at least 1 week and present most of the day, nearly every day (or any duration if hospitalization is necessary).

B. During the period of mood disturbance and increased energy and activity, three (or more) of the following symptoms (four if the mood is only irritable) are present to a significant degree and represent a noticeable change from usual behavior:

1. Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity

2. Decreased need for sleep (eg, feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep)

3. More talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking

4. Flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing

5. Distractibility (ie, attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli), as reported or observed

6. Increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or psychomotor agitation

7. Excessive involvement in activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (eg, engaging in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)

C. The mood disturbance is sufficiently severe to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning or to necessitate hospitalization to prevent harm to self or others, or there are psychotic features.

D. The episode is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (eg, a drug of abuse, a medication, other treatment) or to another medical condition.

Note: A full manic episode that emerges during antidepressant treatment (eg, medication, electroconvulsive therapy) but persists at a fully syndromal level beyond the physiological effect of that treatment is sufficient evidence for a manic episode and, therefore, a bipolar I diagnosis.



Reference:
American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association; 2013.
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